Amazon is doing the world a favor by crushing book publishers – Vox

Amazon is doing the world a favor by crushing book publishers - Vox

Publishers would like writers to believe that the pressure they are feeling from Amazon will trickle down and hurt authors as well. But there is a big difference. Even in the brave new world of e-publishing, authors are still making a crucial contribution to the industry by writing the books. Publishers are getting squeezed out because they don’t contribute anything of value.

via Amazon is doing the world a favor by crushing book publishers – Vox.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Shout it
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Nietzsche’s 10 Rules for Writers

  1. Of prime necessity is life: a style should live.
  2. Style should be suited to the specific person with whom you wish to communicate. The law of mutual relation.
  3. First, one must determine precisely “what-and-what do I wish to say and present,” before you may write. Writing must be mimicry.
  4. Since the writer lacks many of the speaker’s means, he must in general have for his model a very expressive kind of presentation of necessity, the written copy will appear much paler.
  5. The richness of life reveals itself through a richness of gestures. One must learn to feel everything — the length and retarding of sentences, interpunctuations, the choice of words, the pausing, the sequence of arguments — like gestures.
  6. Be careful with periods! Only those people who also have long duration of breath while speaking are entitled to periods. With most people, the period is a matter of affectation.
  7. Style ought to prove that one believes in an idea; not only that one thinks it but also feels it.
  8. The more abstract a truth which one wishes to teach, the more one must first entice the senses.
  9. Strategy on the part of the good writer of prose consists of choosing his means for stepping close to poetry but never stepping into it.
  10. It is not good manners or clever to deprive one’s reader of the most obvious objections. It is very good manners and very clever to leave it to one’s reader alone to pronounce the ultimate quintessence of our wisdom.

via Nietzsche’s 10 Rules for Writers | Brain Pickings.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Shout it
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Issac Asimov’s 1964 Essay: Visit to the World’s Fair of 2014

Even so, mankind will suffer badly from the disease of boredom, a disease spreading more widely each year and growing in intensity. This will have serious mental, emotional and sociological consequences, and I dare say that psychiatry will be far and away the most important medical specialty in 2014. The lucky few who can be involved in creative work of any sort will be the true elite of mankind, for they alone will do more than serve a machine.

Indeed, the most somber speculation I can make about A.D. 2014 is that in a society of enforced leisure, the most glorious single word in the vocabulary will have become work!

via Visit to the World’s Fair of 2014.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Shout it
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Does Physical Media Infer a Level of Authority

The barrier to publishing is lowered in the online world. The capital barrier to entry in communications enterprises has been expressed and considered long before Dan Gillmor pointed us to the term We Media.

Phil Gomes’s post below raises an interesting question. Physical media still carries a fundamental sense of authority and value with a wide range of consumers. Does the willingness of a publisher to invest in creating and distributing that physical product show that someone, somewhere thinks it’s important enough and valuable enough to put their money where someone else’s mouth is?

But do different physical media convey different levels of presumed authority? Any PR professional who has ever had an executive ask “…but is it in the print edition?” knows that, at least generationally, there’s a vestigial preference for paper as a means to convey a level of importance or permanence.

via A World Without Authoritative Physical Media | LinkedIn.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Shout it
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Brian Solis: The 2014 State of Digital Transformation [Infographic]

The 2014 State of Digital Transformation [Infographic] | LinkedIn

Digital transformation is a formal investment in new technology, business models, and supporting systems and processes to change the way companies sell, market, operate and scale in an increasingly digital economy.

Digital transformation is part technology but also part, or in large part, human. Technology is affecting how we connect, collaborate, and share. Technology is also affecting how we, as people, work, learn and buy. Indeed, companies are changing because of technology. They’re also changing by investing in technology. I’ve learned though that those companies that are excelling at parts of digital transformation are also looking at the human side of change, inside and outside the organization. As such, digital transformation is indeed enterprise wide. At the same time, it is an effort that can also be localized to expedite experimentation and a rapid test and learn method to acceleration.

via The 2014 State of Digital Transformation [Infographic] | LinkedIn.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Shout it
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

A buyer’s guide to time spent with media – Media Life Magazine

In 2013, according to estimates by Borrell Associates, the Williamsburg, Va., ad tracking firm, cable TV had the largest share of Americans’ time, at 204 minutes per day.

Broadcast was second at 98.3 minutes and radio was third at 93.5 minutes.

Out of home ranked sixth, behind the internet and video games, at 22.3 minutes per day. Newspapers were just behind at 21.7, and magazines lagged at 15.5.

Many of those traditional media will take a hit over the next few years. Borrell estimates that time spent will radio will plunge by nearly 24 percent by 2018, and broadcast will decline by 7.4 percent.

“Both broadcast TV and radio will see continuing audience shrinkage, and the desktop internet will see loss of time spent in favor of mobile devices,” notes Kip Cassino, executive vice president at Borrell Associates.

Newspapers will decline 31 percent, and magazines will be off 26 percent.

By contrast, OOH will increase by 5.3 percent, to 24 minutes a day.

via A buyer’s guide to time spent with media – Media Life Magazine.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Shout it
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Why Getting It Wrong Is the Future of Design | WIRED

This brings us to an important and exciting moment in the design of our technologies. We have figured out the rules of creating sleek sophistication. We know, more or less, how to get it right. Now, we need a shift in perspective that allows us to move forward. We need a pole right through a horse’s head. We need to enter the third stage of this cycle. It’s time to stop figuring out how to do things the right way, and start getting it wrong.

via Why Getting It Wrong Is the Future of Design | WIRED.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Shout it
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

David Andrew Johnson