The Next Big Thing In Responsive Design | Co.Design | business + design

The Next Big Thing In Responsive Design | Co.Design | business + design

Responsive design, which allows designers and developers to build websites that adapt to every screen size, is one of the most empowering web tools to be adopted in the last decade.

But adapting to the screen is only the first frontier of a new, responsive web.

 

Today, users expect online experiences that not only respond to what device they’re using, but also their location, time of day, what they’ve already read, and events happening in real time.

via The Next Big Thing In Responsive Design | Co.Design | business + design.

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When You Stop Checking Facebook Constantly, These 10 Things Will Happen

I know this sounds like a Facebook bash post and it definitely is to an extent. However, social media sites were made for a reason and somewhere in the last 10 years, we’ve all forgotten what that reason is. That includes you, me, and even the social networks themselves. It’s not about finding people, or about connecting, and creating lifelong friends anymore. It’s about fads. It’s about chain-liking status updates like a smoker chain-smokes. It’s an addiction and it’s a job and you don’t really get anything out of it. We’re not saying you should leave Facebook for good. That’s a little drastic. However, you should definitely have less of it in your life. You’re not missing much by not going on Facebook 30 times a day.

via When You Stop Checking Facebook Constantly, These 10 Things Will Happen.

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The Fragile Dominance of the NFL – The Atlantic

But even that forking understates football’s dominion over television. As viewers have learned to time-shift their favorite shows, where they can skip over ads, the value of a live event has soared. The cost of securing exclusive rights to live sports events have gone up for just about every athletic activity under the sun. But whereas ratings for baseball and other sports have stagnated, the NFL’s ratings have grown. Indeed, they could be the keystone holding together the wobbly arch of pay-TV. Years into the recovery, young people are still resisting the pull of television. TV viewership among every age demographic under 55 is down between 12 and 16 percent since 2009, according to analysis from MoffettNathanson. Without the allure of live sports, the cable bundle might unravel.

As Kevin Clark wrote, the NFL runs the television business, the advertising business, and the attention business. It’s unfair to compare football to the movie industry, the music industry, or any other pop culture industry, because nothing channels eyeballs like football. If the number of people watching the Super Bowl this year had to buy a $10 movie ticket to watch the NFL’s title game, that movie’s domestic box office would be higher than The Avengers and Frozen—combined. Today, the NFL is comparable to the rest of pop culture the way a skyscraper is a part of a strip mall.

via The Fragile Dominance of the NFL – The Atlantic.

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Future Ennui – The Atlantic

Brilliant piece by Ian Bogost in the Altantic.

Future Ennui - The Atlantic

It’s been seven years since the first launch of the iPhone. Before that, smartphones were a curiosity, mostly an affectation of would-be executives—Blackberry and Treo and so forth. Not even a decade ago, they were wild and feral. Today, smartphones are fully domesticated. Tigers made kittens, which we now pet ceaselessly. Over two-thirds of Americans own them, and they have become the primary form of computing.

But along with that domestication comes the inescapability of docility. Have you not accepted your smartphone’s reign over you, rather than lamenting it? Stroking our glass screens is just what we do now, even if it also feels sinful. The hope and promise of new computer technology has given way to the malaise of living with it.

Shifts in technology are also shifts in culture and custom. And these shifts have become more frequent and more rapid over time. Before 2007, one of the most substantial technological shifts in daily life was probably the World Wide Web, which was already commercialized by the mid-1990s and mainstream by 2000. Before that? The personal computer, perhaps, which took from about 1977 until 1993 or so to become a staple of both home and business life. First we computerized work, then we computerized home and social life, then we condensed and transferred that life to our pockets. With the newly announced Apple Watch, now the company wants to condense it even further and have you wear it on your wrist.

via Future Ennui – The Atlantic.

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Inbound marketing: Blogging makes marketers 13X more likely to get positive ROI | VentureBeat | Marketing | by John Koetsier

Hubspot’s massive 3,600-marketer study on the state of inbound marketing shows that blogging is quite possibly the most important thing a performance marketer can do.

via Inbound marketing: Blogging makes marketers 13X more likely to get positive ROI | VentureBeat | Marketing | by John Koetsier.

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Feds chase treasure hunter turned fugitive – The Washington Post

It’s not clear exactly when Thompson disappeared. On Aug. 13, 2012, he failed to appear at a hearing in the court battles, and a federal judge found him in contempt and issued an arrest warrant. Not long after, Kennedy went inside the Florida mansion and found pre-paid disposable cellphones and bank wraps for $10,000 bills, along with a book called “How to Live Your Life Invisible.”

via Feds chase treasure hunter turned fugitive – The Washington Post.

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Michael Moore’s 13 Rules for Making Documentary Films | Indiewire

During his keynote at the Toronto International Film Festival’s sixth annual Doc Conference, Michael Moore shared his advice to documentary filmmakers, beginning with the notion that they shouldn’t be called documentarians at all. “We are not documentarians, we are filmmakers,” he told the crowd at the start of his 13-point manifesto.

I think it’s the humor that gets people there. Satire used to be a great way to make a political statement, but a while back the Left lost its sense of humor, and then you weren’t supposed to be funny anymore. When I had my TV show, on the first day in the writer’s room, I said, “Let’s write down the list of all the things that you’re not supposed to be funny about, and then we’re going to do stories that use humor to say the things we want to say about each of those issues.”

So we made a list: the Holocaust, AIDS, child abuse. I know what you’re thinking — let’s make a funny film about child abuse? Seriously? What are you talking about? Well, of course we’re not making a “funny” film about child abuse — but if humor can be used in a devastating fashion to shake people out of their seats and do something, well, it will be worth it. Humor can be devastating. Humor, ridicule, can be a very sharp edged sword to go after those in power, to go after those who are hurting others.

Also this rule… 8. Point your cameras at the cameras:

Show the people why the mainstream media isn’t telling them what is going on. You’ve seen this in my films, where I stop filming whatever it is that’s going on, and I just turn my camera on the press pool. Oh, that is a pathetic sight, isn’t it? They are all lined up with their microphones like the guy in “Bowling for Columbine” who is at the funeral of a 6-year-old, and he’s trying to fix his hair out in front of the funeral home and he’s yelling at the producer through the earpiece, and all of a sudden he realizes he’s going live and, bam — it’s showtime! It really shows you how little they truly care, and how little REAL information you’re getting about the issue.

via Michael Moore’s 13 Rules for Making Documentary Films | Indiewire.

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