How Technicolor Changed Storytelling – The Atlantic

How Technicolor Changed Storytelling - The Atlantic

Meanwhile, the film industry was considering what the addition of color meant as a narrative device. "Something living had been brought into the world that was not there before," the Broadway set designer Robert Edmond Jones wrote in 1935 of the newly honed Technicolor process. The Wizard of Oz, in 1939, employed one of the most famous uses of Technicolor as narrative: the moment when Dorothy leaves her sepia-toned reality for the colorful land of Oz. It was in the 1930s, too, that Technicolor cameramen, previously seen as mere technicians, were beginning to be honored for their artistic work.

via How Technicolor Changed Storytelling – The Atlantic.

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15 years later, lessons from the failed AOL-Time Warner merger

The deal should remind investors to take a closer look at today’s hottest tech startups, says Columbia Business School professor Rita Gunther McGrath.

via 15 years later, lessons from the failed AOL-Time Warner merger.

The commentary correctly identifies that AOL’s business model was connectivity. But I take it step further: it did not value it’s customers as a community.

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The beginning of the end of Facebook’s traffic engine » Nieman Journalism Lab

In 2015, then, the winners of the Facebook attention lottery are going to be more videos, as well as genuinely native, in-app content from advertisers. The losers are going to be external websites who have become reliant on the Facebook traffic firehose. That traffic is going to start falling, in 2015, for the first time. And the repercussions are likely to be huge.

via The beginning of the end of Facebook’s traffic engine » Nieman Journalism Lab.

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David Andrew Johnson